If there are any old salts around who have information about the Chief or the dog, please send it in.

The Mystery Of The Three-Legged Dog

 

 

References keep appearing about a "Three Legged Dog" that was allegedly a Coast Guard pet or mascot during WWII. Does anybody have any information on this dog?


From Ralph Sproston, W5TCE:

Back in 1941, when I graduated from the Resident Radio School at New London, I was assigned to the 5th Coast Guard District radio station NMN, located at Princess Anne, Va., for further transfer to the USCGC ALEXANDER HAMILTON when she returned from weather patrol. At that time the Chief Radioman and Officer-in-Charge was a full-blooded Oklahoma Indian named, spelled phonetically, “SIGH KISSCHASSEY”, who had a three-legged dog that lived with him near the station. The dog was run over by a tractor when he was a puppy and lost his right front leg as a result. The operation left no visible scar, and many people thought the dog was deformed at birth because he could do anything a four-legged dog could do . . . and then some.

The Chief and the dog were inseparable—when you saw one, you saw the other. It was interesting to see three-footed dog tracks in the sand at the beach. The dog was the radio station’s mascot.


From Warren Wilson, W4NIE:

I’m sorry I can’t help on the three-legged dog at NMN. I was stationed there for about three months commencing in June 1942 when Chief Music was the Officer-in-Charge. [He was] a very  pleasant Chief.

NMN was housed in an old lifeboat station, right on the beach at Dam Neck, Va. Camp Pendleton and Army Coastal Artillery was a short distance north, and the Navy had an anti-aircraft Gunnery School about 1000 yards to the south. The favorite liberty spot was Virginia Beach, which was about four miles north of Dam Neck, if you followed the beach. We were occasionally challenged by beach patrol and always by Army sentries at Camp Pendleton.

I was station at Pt. Vicente NMQ late in 1944 and there was a three-legged dog there named “General,” a German Shepherd. He was noted for chasing skunks at night and smelling like one all day. I never got very friendly with him.


Later From Ralph Sproston:

I phoned an old ALEXANDER HAMILTON shipmate, Wo Ogletree. We were on the CGC Alexander Hamilton when she was stationed in Norfolk. Wo had visited Princess Anne, NMN, many times and recalls the Officer-in-Charge, Si Kisschassie, proudly wearing his four gold hashmarks on his Chief’s uniform. Ogletree advised the Chief was a Dakota Blackfoot. I also phone Anthony Nowles, who was a Radioman striker in 1941 at NMN and retired as a Chief Radioman in 1959. He confirmed the dog’s name as “General” and that Si’s last name was spelled K-I-S-S-A-C-H-Y. He further recalled Si being transferred in 1942 to the West Coast and took General with him. I imagine Si would have been a Warrant Officer in 1944, since most pre-war Chiefs made, at least, warrant status by war’s end. Some went as high as full Lieutenant but were busted back to lower grades after the war.

 

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